Top 3 Reasons Nonprofit Organizations Use Twitter

Twitter is the must-have social media platform for every nonprofit organization. Here are three reasons why.

Twitter is a godsend for nonprofit organizations

Whether you are a charity, a service organization, or an NGO, there is something powerfully useful about this particular social media platform. It would be easy to list off a large number of reasons that Twitter rocks for nonprofits! But we’re going to concern ourselves with the top three. These 3 reasons alone should be enough to convince any organization that they should be Tweeting.

  1. It’s Easy to Use
    A Twitter account can be set up in only a few minutes, and an organization can be Tweeting within seconds of setting up their account. The built-in constraints of the platform are actually quite liberating. Whereas a blog post, or publication, requires intense planning, research, and editing, Tweet takes only a moment to compose, and the occasional grammatical slip is instantly forgivable, because Twitter is meant to look and feel spontaneous.A basic Tweet (Twitter post) consists of up to 140 typed characters. Add an image, a link, and some hashtags… And you are in business!
  2. It ls Useful
    Need to share some exciting news? Get a message out quickly? Learn something new that you think your stakeholders would like to know? Tweet it!Would you like to set up an online chat? Choose a hash tag, let your followers know what the tag is and what time to meet on Twitter… And away you go! Instant online (public) conversation.Looking to increase the visibility of your organization? Trying to build more website traffic? Want to bring more readers to your blog posts? Tweets are now indexed by Google. Post a link to your latest blog post to your Twitter account. You’ve done your own SEO (search engine optimization).
  3. It is Powerful
    The power of Twitter is impressive. In fact, it can be hard to fathom how much power can be harnessed from a social media platform that is limited by design to only microblogging with a maximum of 140 characters. Where does this power lie? What makes it so powerful?The primary power of Twitter is that it forms the core or hub of your organization’s online presence. It functions like superglue to bind an organization’s website, blog, Facebook, and other Internet based platforms into a cohesive whole. If you are hosting an event, and have posted the details to your website, Tweet a link to the website. If your organization has posted a group of photographs to its Facebook page, mention that, and link to it, on Twitter. And this integration goes both ways. It’s possible to have all your Tweets show up on your blog home page and on your website too. This makes it easy to convert an occasional website visitor into a regular Twitter follower.There are also some “hidden” features that can be extremely useful to some organizations. My favorite of these for nonprofit use is the feature that allows an organization to “protect its Tweets”. This feature allows only those people and accounts that are approved by you to see your organization’s Tweets. Think about how useful it could be to a condo board that wants to get a message out right away, but that only condo residents could see and respond to? Or a membership based organization that wants to communicate instantly and privately with all of its members, but only its members?

    Still not sure that Twitter is powerful?

    If Twitter could get Donald Trump elected president of the United States, just imagine what it could do for your organization! (Sorry… That was my “trump” card.)

I’d love the opportunity to talk to you more about what Twitter can do for your organization. If you’re in Toronto, let’s get together. Shoot me an email.

 

Follow buzzyness.com on Twitter
Follow us on Twitter

As easy as Twitter is to use, getting started can be intimidating for beginners. I love helping organizations to get started. By hiring me to get you “over the hump”, your organization will be able to use Twitter effectively and inexpensively. There is no good reason to pay hundreds, or thousands of dollars every month to a company to look after your tweets and twitter account. In fact, your communications will be way more effective if you tweet for yourself.

 

LinkedIn for Nonprofits

LinkedIn for nonprofits, charities, and NGOs

Is LinkedIn a useful tool for nonprofit organizations? It’s pretty much a “no-brainer” for self-employed professionals, job seekers, employers, and corporations seeking to engage with people who are actively seeking to expand their career growth networks. But what about non-profits and charities? Is there a place for them on LinkedIn too?

ABSOLUTELY!

LinkedIn represents a fabulous networking and engagement opportunity for nonprofit organisations of all kinds!

Whether your organization is interested in promoting and marketing its cause, looking for volunteers, seeking motivated employees, or simply looking to increase its visibility, LinkedIn can help.

It is also pretty easy to get started, and to maintain your organizational presence too. The first step is to create your personal account there. Join LinkedIn if you haven’t already. Before moving forward, you might want to familiarize yourself with the platform. Search out, and connect with some of your friends and colleagues that are also on LinkedIn.

[perfectpullquote align=”full” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]Remember, LinkedIn is NOT Facebook! Unless your nonprofit is an animal rescue organization there is no room there for cat videos and puppy pictures.[/perfectpullquote]

OK. Feeling confident now? Let’s get to work for your organization. The quickest and easiest way to create a presence for your group on LinkedIn, is to actually just go ahead and “create a group“. Give it a name that reflects either the name or purpose of your organization, and invite all of the members of your organization to join the group.

GREAT!

You and your organization are now active on LinkedIn. Congratulations! But now what? Now it’s time to put the platform to work for your non-profit. The most important step is to integrate your new account with your existing Internet presence. Make sure that it becomes part of your entire communications ecosystem – both online and offline. Put a link to your LinkedIn group on your website and blog, and links to your website, blog, and other social media pages in your LinkedIn group.

Finally, like all social media, and like all communications of every type, the success of your LinkedIn group is tied directly to the amount of effort you put into maintaining it. This does not have to be a full time job. Heck, it doesn’t even have to be somebody’s part time job! But it does take a bit of time, and a lot of discipline. Just like Twitter, or Facebook, or your mailing list, your LinkedIn presence is unlikely to serve your organization if nothing ever appears in it. Set a time in your calendar, whether once or twice a day, or just once a week – but make that time as critical to you as you would a doctor’s appointment for your child.

  • Post some news
  • Start a conversation
  • Ask a question
  • Answer questions
  • Share an interesting article
  • Share your blog posts
  • Share someone else’s blog post
  • Post recruitment notices for volunteers and staff

There is ALWAYS something that you can communicate that will be of interest to your stakeholders. All you need to do is find it, and post it. In fact, I’ll be doing that a moment from now. You’ll find a link to this article on my own LinkedIn account – RIGHT HERE.